VISIONALITY prides itself on being “politically neutral” – but this does not mean we will stay silent in all situations. 

This is one of them. 

Racism should not be seen as a political issue, because it’s a human issue. 
It’s an issue that is often rooted in misunderstanding, fear, and ignorance. 
It’s an issue around the misinterpretation that this country was founded on equality. 
It’s an issue that the systems our country created after its founding do not, in fact, provide

“Liberty and Justice For All.” 

This country has struggled to give ALL of its people a seat at the table. However, we need to be specific and see these recent events for what they truly are – black people being targeted and mistreated – and in some cases killed – simply because of a pigment in their skin.

 
Frankly, VISIONALITY is led by women who are white, who believed that helping the nonprofit sector as whole meant that they were in fact, helping ALL succeed. And we’re also a company who has learned how flawed that thinking is. We have worked hard, but we have also benefited from undeniable privilege along the way.


And yet, we also believe the success of a company like VISIONALITY is crucial. What the world needs now is a whole bunch of brave, independently-owned, equality-minded businesses run by fierce ass women.


And so we’re making pledges. We’re doubling down on our commitment to make the world a better place. Because we need companies like VISIONALITY – companies that help those who help the underserved. Companies that build up their employees and leave clients and the community better than we found them. 
 

We’re not going to claim that this is comprehensive or that there will not be more work to do in the months and years ahead, but this is what we’re pledging:

VISIONALITY is an anti-racist business that is committed to supporting and lifting the voices of Black people locally, regionally, nationally and globally. 

We weep for Breonna. We cry for Ahmaud. And we yell for George.

BLACK. LIVES. MATTER.

  • To keep the conversation about race and access ongoing amongst our team and our clients – to not be afraid to challenge people to make the table bigger. 


  • To strive every day to treat people equally, to constantly check ourselves for potential blind spots, to make sure OUR table is big enough.


  • To listen – this is one of those instances where we are NOT the subject matter experts, and we will sit and give space to and amplify those who are.


  • To take a more active role in pushing nonprofits to think beyond the role of simple diversity, and instead deeply embrace systemic changes towards inclusion in staffing, in boardrooms, and in their services.